Reblogging old posts (from googleblogs)

So, the food storage  area is becoming more organized.  I’m noticing holes in my storage that I didn’t see when it was just stacks of stuff.  So, I’m looking for ways to fill it in.

We raise our chickens for meat & eggs, raise a few veggies in the garden, and learn what weeds are actually food in disguise.  But some things must be bought.  Without breaking the bank, or spending the mortgage.

 

This site has a good list of $10-15 per week purchases that will set up a food storage  system for 2 people.

http://www.self-reliance-exchange.com/?p=7713”

 

 Salt and flour and sugar & things like olives and oil.  Maybe even canned ‘instant’ food, for days we’re too tired to cook.

 

Back at the chicken coop, a girl escaped the other day.  Managed to get left outside overnight, too.  Jim found her moping by the coop the next day.  She was sure that there was normally a door back into the coop, but just couldn’t find it.

Friday storage sales!

You’ll notice that I included a couple of fresh produce in this week.  That’s because you can BWB tomatoes and strawberries (Jam, jelly or syrup) just be sure to add a teaspoon or 2 of lemon juice.

Specials  Walmart  No Frills  Loblaws  Metro
fresh tomatoes by lb  $    1.00
BBQ sauce 455ml  $    1.00
Salad Dressing 250ml  $    1.00
Yellow Mustard 225ml  $    1.00
Classico Pasta Sauce 650 ml jar  $         2.47  $    2.00
Colgate/ Crest toothepaste 85-100ml  $    1.00
Irish Spring soap 6 X 90g bars  $    3.00  $    2.99
Maple Leaf flakes of ham/ chicken 156g  $    1.00  $    1.00
Grace coconut water 310ml  2/$1.00
Maxwell House instant coffee 300g  $    3.00
Strawberries (USA) 1lb  3/$5.00  2/ $4.00
Clover Leaf Tune 170g  $    1.00
Del Monte fruit 398ml  4/ $5.00
Campbells tomato/ chicken noodle soups 284ml  3/ $2.00
Campbells broth or reduced fat soups 284ml  3/ $4.00
Barilla Pasta 375g – 1 lb  $    1.00
Tetley teas 20-24 in cardboard tin  $    1.99
Unico Pasta sauce 680 ml can  $    1.00
Concentrated No Name bleach 1.89 liters  $    1.79
Simply Natural organic pasta sauce 739ml  2/ $5.00
San Zenone organic corn pasta 340 g  2/ $5.00
Concentrated Clorox Bleach 1.89l  $    2.29
PC® super soft bathroom tissue 24 rolls  $    5.99
PC Gourmet Great Cdn Coffee 930g tin  $    8.99
Kellogs all bran or nutrigrain bars 180-295g  2/ $5.00
Always pads 24-48, Tampax tampons 32-54  $    8.49
Del Monte vegetables 341-398ml  $    1.00
Heinz beans or pasta 14oz  4/ $4.00
Clover leaf sockeye salmon 213g  $         2.97  $          2.99
Store brand white vinegar 4l  $         1.97
Store brand ketchup 1l  $         2.17  $          1.99
Equate brand maxipads asst sizes/ types  $         4.74
Equate bandaids 80pc  $         2.37
Equate ibuprofin 144ct 400mg  $       10.97
Similac Advance infant formula 658g  $       25.83
Aylmer diced tomatoes 796ml  $          0.99
Hunts Thick & Rich tomato sauce 680ml  $          0.99
ItalPasta 500g  $          0.99
Incredibles Life Smart Canned veggies 199-398ml  $          0.79
 Store brand honey 1kg  $          8.99
 Store brand jam or jelly 500ml  $          2.99
 Store brand sunflower oil 3l  $          6.99
 Green Giant vegetables 284-398ml  $          0.99

Pressure canning (part1)

Pressure Canning!!

While I don’t really recommend Walmart, because they are the anti-Christ of the shop local movement… pressure canners can be *expensive*!  Mine was over $200.  And then you’re looking at replacing the gasket at least once a year, more if you do a lot of canning.

Of course mine needs no gaskets, but I’m married to an awesome man.

(This is mine!  “An All-American 921 21 1/2 quart pressure cooker/canner. This is the cream of the crop, top of the line pressure canner, people! In this canner, you can process 19 pint jars or 7 quart sized jars at one time. Imagine the possibilities!

This pressure canner:

  • is made in America!  Not Canada, but better than China.
  • has no plastic or rubber gaskets
  • has 400+ positive reviews on Amazon!

You will want this type of pressure canner for processing anything that does not have high acidity. Want to can beans? Peas? Carrots? Meats? Broth? Ghee?  You’ll need this beautiful pressure canner!”)

Pressure canning seems to scare a lot of people, even my mom is worried that I’ll blow up the kitchen.  She’s torn between her need to hover and make sure I’m safe, and her desire to run and hide.  She is, in this case only, completely wrong.

Pressure canners are safe, simple and extremely useful.  Canned meats and stews are precooked, shelf stable, and ready to eat or use in a fast meal.  Just be sure to follow instructions, not “wing it”.

And get a pressure CANNER, not a pressure COOKER.  The cookers just are not big enough to safely can in.

General instructions:

Put clean jars and lids in a big pot and bring to a boil.  Boil 5 minutes, turn off heat, but leave on burner.

Fish out the jars and lids with appropriate tools and carefully fill with *whatever low acid food you like, within guidelines* to 1/2 inch of the rim.  Clean the rim with a damp cloth, and put he lids on, tightening to fingertip tight.  DO NOT overtighten, jars will break in the canner.  Trust me, it’s a waste of food and effort, and a real mess to clean up.

Place the jars carefully on the rack inside the canner (According to the canners instructions, different canners hold different numbers and sizes of jars).  Fill with water to where THAT canners instructions say.  My current canner wants 3-4 inches of water with the jars in.  My last canner wanted 2-3 inches without the jars.  Check your instructions, running out of water will wreck your jars and deform the bottom of the canner.  (don’t ask how I know this)  I add a glub of white vinegar to prevent hard water crusting on my jars.

Bring to a boil and watch for steam to escape the ‘blow-hole’, it should be venting strongly.  Some instructions say to let it vent for 15 minutes, some say 10 minutes.  Do what you read in (yup) the instructions for that canner!

Here’s where I deviate from the canner’s paperwork. They say to put the weight on at 10 lbs pressure, I always use 15 lbs.  This is why.

We have a friend who is a microbiologist, specializing in germs.  He has talked about superbugs, MRSA,  and other Stephen King-type germs.  I believe that all of the anti-bacterial crap people use in their homes is growing superbug versions of the usual germs we have just laying around in the home.  It certainly has created antibiotic resistant bacteria in hospitals.  10lbs pressure is 240F, enough to kill everything including botulism.  So it’s probably safe enough.  15lbs pressure is 255F, so I am guaranteed that it’s hot enough, even for superbug versions.

TIMING!  Can things like stew or soup for the longest time needed for any ingredient.  ie: a beef stew is timed for the meat, not the veggies, because that is the longest time.  Time charts can be found here: Charts

At the end of the timing, turn off the burner.  DO NOT remove the weight.  The sudden change in pressure will explode your jars.  Wait until the pressure gauge reads zero, then remove the weight, no steam should jet out.  If it does, immediately put the weight back on and wait longer for it to cool.

Take off the lid and carefully remove the jars.  Put them on a towel covered counter to finish cooling.  They may still be boiling in the jars, which is kinda cool.  The lids should seal with a loud “pock” noise.  Remove the rings, the lids should be tightly vacuum sealed to the jars.  Let cool, wipe, and label.  Store somewhere dark and cool.

Recipes in later postings, check my pages.

The reviews are in!

Well, one anyway.  On my Laurie’s Spice Blends: Sweet Curry.

From my friends, the Daws:

Result: Three empty plates and three VERY happy diners.  Ecstatic. Sweet and spicy without too much fire. And gone. We need a resupply.

Sounds like a good review to me!

So see the curried chicken recipe in my files, and try it out for yourself.

How and What (part 3)

Pressure Canning!!

While I don’t really recommend Walmart, because they are the anti-Christ of the shop local movement… pressure canners can be *expensive*!  Mine was over $200.  And then you’re looking at replacing the gasket at least once a year, more if you do a lot of canning.

Of course mine needs no gaskets, but I’m married to an awesome man.

(This is mine!  “An All-American 921 21 1/2 quart pressure cooker/canner. This is the cream of the crop, top of the line pressure canner, people! In this canner, you can process 19 pint jars or 7 quart sized jars at one time. Imagine the possibilities!

This pressure canner:

  • is made in America!  Not Canada, but better than China.
  • has no plastic or rubber gaskets
  • has 400+ positive reviews on Amazon!

You will want this type of pressure canner for processing anything that does not have high acidity. Want to can beans? Peas? Carrots? Meats? Broth? Ghee?  You’ll need this beautiful pressure canner!”)

Pressure canning seems to scare a lot of people, even my mom is worried that I’ll blow up the kitchen.  She’s torn between her need to hover and make sure I’m safe, and her desire to run and hide.  She is, in this case only, completely wrong.

Pressure canners are safe, simple and extremely useful.  Canned meats and stews are precooked, shelf stable, and ready to eat or use in a fast meal.  Just be sure to follow instructions, not “wing it”.

And get a pressure CANNER, not a pressure COOKER.  The cookers just are not big enough to safely can in.

General instructions:

Put clean jars and lids in a big pot and bring to a boil.  Boil 5 minutes, turn off heat, but leave on burner.

Fish out the jars and lids with appropriate tools and carefully fill with *whatever low acid food you like, within guidelines* to 1/2 inch of the rim.  Clean the rim with a damp cloth, and put he lids on, tightening to fingertip tight.  DO NOT overtighten, jars will break in the canner.  Trust me, it’s a waste of food and effort, and a real mess to clean up.

Place the jars carefully on the rack inside the canner (According to the canners instructions, different canners hold different numbers and sizes of jars).  Fill with water to where THAT canners instructions say.  My current canner wants 3-4 inches of water with the jars in.  My last canner wanted 2-3 inches without the jars.  Check your instructions, running out of water will wreck your jars and deform the bottom of the canner.  (don’t ask how I know this)  I add a glub of white vinegar to prevent hard water crusting on my jars.

Bring to a boil and watch for steam to escape the ‘blow-hole’, it should be venting strongly.  Some instructions say to let it vent for 15 minutes, some say 10 minutes.  Do what you read in (yup) the instructions for that canner!

Here’s where I deviate from the canner’s paperwork. They say to put the weight on at 10 lbs pressure, I always use 15 lbs.  This is why.

We have a friend who is a microbiologist, specializing in germs.  He has talked about superbugs, MRSA,  and other Stephen King-type germs.  I believe that all of the anti-bacterial crap people use in their homes is growing superbug versions of the usual germs we have just laying around in the home.  It certainly has created antibiotic resistant bacteria in hospitals.  10lbs pressure is 240F, enough to kill everything including botulism.  So it’s probably safe enough.  15lbs pressure is 255F, so I am guaranteed that it’s hot enough, even for superbug versions.

TIMING!  Can things like stew or soup for the longest time needed for any ingredient.  ie: a beef stew is timed for the meat, not the veggies, because that is the longest time.  Time charts can be found here: Charts

At the end of the timing, turn off the burner.  DO NOT remove the weight.  The sudden change in pressure will explode your jars.  Wait until the pressure gauge reads zero, then remove the weight, no steam should jet out.  If it does, immediately put the weight back on and wait longer for it to cool.

Take off the lid and carefully remove the jars.  Put them on a towel covered counter to finish cooling.  They may still be boiling in the jars, which is kinda cool.  The lids should seal with a loud “pock” noise.  Remove the rings, the lids should be tightly vacuum sealed to the jars.  Let cool, wipe, and label.  Store somewhere dark and cool.

Recipes in later postings, check my pages.

Free homestead, garden, and canning books!

http://www.amazon.ca/The-Enlightened-Prepper-ebook/dp/B0094JWI7Q/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1366557803&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Enlightened+Prepper

The Enlightened Prepper

http://www.amazon.ca/Canology-Healthier-Preserving-Locally-Grown-ebook/dp/B00B4JFHWM/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1366483181&sr=1-1&keywords=Canology+-+A+Modern+Guide+-+How+To+Eat+Healthier+%26+Save+Money+By+Preserving+Locally-Grown+Natural+Foods

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B005MESSLM/ref=kinw_myk_ro_title

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00CCW8V14/ref=kinw_myk_ro_title

Real Homestead Survivalist (Raise Rabbits & Make Money Too)